The Fortunate Island Of Monhegan

Author: Charles Francis Jenney
Publisher: Forgotten Books
ISBN: 1334724970
Size: 18.79 MB
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Excerpt from The Fortunate Island of Monhegan: A Historical Monograph Monhegan is the most prominent landmark on the central and westerly coast of Maine, and is the western most of the outlying islands off Penobscot Bay. Situated in latitude 43 46' N., and longitude 69 18' W, it is said to contain 655 acres, and the adjacent island of Manana, 77 acres.5 It is about one and five-eighths miles in length, and almost five-eighths of a mile in width. In nautical miles, it is distant from Cape Ann 87 miles, from Highland Light on Cape God, 108, and from Boston Light, about 110. Its rocky shores rise boldly from the sea in two places to the height of 160 feet. Not being encompassed by other islands, it is visible for a considerable distance. Westerly and southerly there is, north of the Gulf of Mexico, no other western Atlantic island of equal elevation. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works."

Boldness Be My Friend

Author: Richard Pape
Publisher: Hachette UK
ISBN: 9780755360499
Size: 19.78 MB
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"Escape... escape... escape... by God!"' was his constant exhortation. "Never mind hunger pains, discomfort, or any other agony. Let escape become your passion, your one and only obsession until you finally reach home."' Shot down over Berlin in 1941, Richard Pape's saga of captivity is a story of courage unmatched in the annals of escape. Four escapes took him across the breadth of German-occupied Europe; to Poland and Czechoslovakia; to Austria and Hungary. Aggressive and impetuous, his adventures sweep the reader along on a torrent of excitement.

Voyages Of Samuel De Champlain Complete

Author: Samuel de Champlain
Publisher: Library of Alexandria
ISBN: 9781465539595
Size: 15.77 MB
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Champlain was descended from an ancestry whose names are not recorded among the renowned families of France. He was the son of Antoine de Champlain, a captain in the marine, and his wife Marguerite LeRoy. They lived in the little village of Brouage, in the ancient province of Saintonge. Of their son Samuel, no contemporaneous record is known to exist indicating either the day or year of his birth. The period at which we find him engaged in active and responsible duties, such as are usually assigned to mature manhood, leads to the conjecture that he was born about the year 1567. Of his youth little is known. The forces that contributed to the formation of his character are mostly to be inferred from the abode of his early years, the occupations of those by whom he was surrounded, and the temper and spirit of the times in which he lived. Brouage is situated in a low, marshy region, on the southern bank of an inlet or arm of the sea, on the southwestern shores of France, opposite to that part of the Island of Oleron where it is separated from the mainland only by a narrow channel. Although this little town can boast a great antiquity, it never at any time had a large population. It is mentioned by local historians as early as the middle of the eleventh century. It was a seigniory of the family of Pons. The village was founded by Jacques de Pons, after whose proper name it was for a time called Jacopolis, but soon resumed its ancient appellation of Brouage. An old chronicler of the sixteenth century informs us that in his time it was a port of great importance, and the theatre of a large foreign commerce. Its harbor, capable of receiving large ships, was excellent, regarded, indeed, as the finest in the kingdom of France. It was a favorite idea of Charles VIII. to have at all times several war-ships in this harbor, ready against any sudden invasion of this part of the coast. At the period of Champlain's boyhood, the village of Brouage had two absorbing interests. First, it had then recently become a military post of importance; and second, it was the centre of a large manufacture of salt. To these two interests, the whole population gave their thoughts, their energy, and their enterprise.